A review of william blakes the chimney sweeper

Blake does not indicate whether he agrees or disagrees. He saw in his dream that many Chimney sweepers, who were named Dick, Joe, Ned and Jack, were dead and their bodies were lying in caged coffins, made of black-colored wood.

But if this is a good consolation at all is up to the reader to decide. But that judgment is unsettled by second thoughts: As we read the mom, sitting beneath the chimney newly swept in Golden Square, our discomfort arises not from the necessity of chimney-sweeping, but from the sense that a child may belong so little to the living that he is driven for necessary solace to a posthumous exploration Gardner There is only a matter of time before he suffers the effects of his condition, especially in societies that crush the poor and neglect helpless children.

The "unpleasantness of great poetry," as exemplified by Blake, is rooted in a seductively beautiful process of unbalancing and disrupting.

The Angel opened the coffins containing the bodies and set all the bodies free from the bondage of coffins. Since there were many families that were so poor at the time the poem was written that they could not feed and sold them in order to prevent them from starvation.

Emergence of Romanticism Essay And the word sold is meant to stand out in the second line. The reader wants to be as innocent and hopeful and believe the same message.

The optimistic outlook, although comforting and real to Tom, is revealed to be unrealistic on earth. Its delusional or deceptive Angel with a bright key exposes religion as exploiting the credulous children, rather than protecting them or rescuing them.

This is a contrast to the first chimney sweeper Tom, who has a name, emotions and feelings so one can sympathies with him. This criticizes the way those children were treated.

Social Criticism in William Blakes Chimney Sweeper Essay

It shows the untainted world of an innocent child against the mature world of experience and corruption. It also shows the conflict that the reader has to deal with: If the last stanza had the same rhyme scene of as the dream the readers would have been tempted to believe the promise of a true positive ending for Tom to maintain his blind and simple obedience.

The last two lines use the words warm and harm that appear to be rhyme by a glance due to the spelling. He saw in his dream that many Chimney sweepers, who were named Dick, Joe, Ned and Jack, were dead and their bodies were lying in caged coffins, made of black-colored wood.

This would have been criticized a lot more nowadays as slavery still was quite common back then when the poem was written.

This was even worse because of the infections through the soot as chimney sweepers were washed rarely and were sleeping on the soot they swept during the day and in a black and very narrow room with all the other chimney sweepers.

Unlike the exciting and wistful tone of the beautiful dream with happy rhyming ends words such as key and free; run and sun; boy and joy the unrhymed words in the last stanza include dark and work.

The first one I Just explained but it also suggests that even the innocent child is suffering and shows it through weeping. The two sweeps state a condition, the difference being in relationships, as the illustrations signify An Angel, who was carrying a shining key, came near the coffins.

This prevents the readers from just flowing aimlessly and carelessly through the poem as if it were a delightful nursery rhyme. Blake also criticizes the church, God and society. Since that tender age the little boy is sweeping chimney and sleeping at night in the soot-smeared body, without washing off the soot blackness.

They cast off the burden of life along with the bags of soot at the time of death. Though he does not consciously realize it yet, subconsciously he is weeping and not Warm and happy at all.

We remember the psychological, political and religious philosophies and commands that morally bankrupt leaders used to encourage the defenseless to impose their own self suppression and accept the dictatorship of those in power.

Romanticism, Revolution and Language. The narrator told Tom to be calm because lice will not breed in the pate without hair and there will be no risk for hair to catch fire. We weep with Tom as his innocence is being forcibly stolen from him. Being a good boy meaner doing his duty here.

The narrator told Tom to be calm because lice will not breed in the pate without hair and there will be no risk for hair to catch fire. Eliot who has a way of parodying himself even while making wise observations.

William Blake's two poems called

You can also browse "Fray" discussions of previous classic poems. The lack of rhyme also purposefully and effectively creates a huge disconnect from the rest of "The Chimney Sweeper" in the Songs of Innocence. These children were either orphans or founding or were sold by poor parents to Master Sweepers for as little as two guineas.

William Blake Here is a pair of poems more familiar than many I've presented here in the monthly "Classic Poem" feature—familiar, maybe, yet with an unsettling quality that seems inexhaustible. Why would Blake label these tales as such?.

After introducing us to Tom, he relates a very strange dream that Tom had one night (it involved chimney sweepers in coffins, angels, flying, and a few other bizarre things).

The Chimney Sweeper by William Blake

The poem concludes with Tom and the speaker waking up. The Chimney Sweeper by William Blake Prev Article Next Article In (the year of the beginning of the French Revolution), Blake brought out his Songs of Innocence, which included The Chimney Sweeper.

The poem is narrated by a chimney sweeper. He tells us a little bit about himself first before giving us the lowdown on another chimney sweeper, Tom Dacre.

Chimney Sweeper (Taurus Poems)

After introducing us to Tom, he relates a very strange dream that Tom had one night (it involved chimney sweepers in coffins, angels, flying.

William Blake was an English poet, painter, and printmaker. Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake's work is today considered seminal and significant in the history of both poetry and the visual arts. Blake's prophetic poetry has been said to form "what is in proportion to its merits the least read body of poetry in the language"/5.

Sep 14,  · William Blake's two poems called "The Chimney Sweeper" create art by keeping us uncomfortable. I also analyze the poem itself and the message Blake was trying to convey.

Analysis of William Blake's "The Chimney Sweeper" "The Chimney Sweeper" is a poem about young children who are sold by their fathers to work in the mines. They have gruesome jobs, and the workdays are long.3/5(1).

A review of william blakes the chimney sweeper
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The Chimney Sweeper: When my mother died I was very young by William Blake | Poetry Foundation